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It is important to have a Will to avoid dying "Intestate".

Without a valid Will in place your assets are distributed according to a fixed legal process which means that your intended recipients may have no legal claim to them whatsoever.
Revocation of previous wills
Appointment of executors
Appointment of guardians
Specific gifts
The residue
Funeral and burial arrangements
Signing and Witnessing
Basic Wills
A Will is a list of instructions telling people what to do with your property when you die. By making a Will you can ensure that you leave your property, money and other assets to the people you choose. A Will is one of the most important legal documents that you will sign. Anyone aged 18 or over can make a Will.

If you are a couple then it is usually Mirror Wills that you require.

Wills follow the same basic structure
Revocation of previous wills

Did you know that certain circumstances revoke a previous Will including marriage and the births of children? We can help you ensure that your Will is always revised appropriately and remains valid. To avoid confusion over which Will should be used, there is normally a clause to cancel all previous Wills.

Appointment of executors

An executor is a person appointed in the Will to deal with your property upon your death. We can help you appoint the most appropriate people. Their job is to collect your property, pay anything owed and then distribute the remainder of the property to those you want to benefit. It helps to name alternatives in case your first choices are unable or unwilling to carry out the role. If you prefer professional executors we can arrange that for you.

Appointment of guardians

It is so important to appoint Legal Guardians for minor children in case both parents should die. Don't assume that trusted relatives or friends will automatically take on this role. Without the right provisions in place they may need to prove in court that they are suitable whilst social workers place children in care until they are satisfied that an appropriate long-term arrangement has been found. This could of course differ from your own choice.

Funeral arrangements

You may include funeral preferences including burial or cremation. These are not legally binding but are usually adhered to. It can be a great comfort to loved ones to be guided by your choices and know that they have carried out your wishes.

Specific gifts

From expensive heirlooms to cherished items of little monetary value, you can leave specific objects to those you most wish to own them in your Will. Beneficiaries may be specifically named or defined, for example "grandchildren". You can choose alternatives in case beneficiaries die before the Will is executed. You can also make conditions. For example, you may decide a beneficiary only inherit property or assets when they reach a certain age.

The residue

Normally your Will will include a clause to deal with any property or assets which you have not specifically left to your beneficiaries. Where the residual is to be left to more than one person, the Will should state the proportions each beneficiary is to receive.

Signing and Witnessing

Finally, your signature should be witnessed by two witnesses, both present at the same time.